Monday, January 19, 2009

What Pedigree dogs turning into

Pedigree dogs are becoming stupid as we breed them for looks, not brains
Pedigree dogs have become increasingly stupid as they are now bred for their looks, not their brains, according to new research.
Their mental and physical agility of many breeds is being eroded as owners now look for docile, pretty pets to live in their homes.
In the 19th century dogs were more likely to be selected for their strength and skills, so they were able to earn their keep guarding homes and livestock and fetching the quarry on a hunting trip.
But a significant change in breeding trends has meant the ancestors of these proud working dogs are now less responsive to commands and not as alert or attentive.
Scientists in Sweden have found strong evidence that breeding for appearance has led to a decline in intelligence.

How To Live on Practically Nothing


We ain't as dumb as we look

After having dug to a depth of 10 feet last year, New York scientists found traces of a copper-wire system dating back 100 years, and they came to the conclusion that their ancestors already had a telephone network more than 100 years ago.
Not to be outdone by New Yorkers, in the weeks that followed, California scientists dug to a depth of 20 feet, and shortly after, headlines in the LA Times newspaper read: ' California archaeologists have found traces of 200 year old copper-wire system and have concluded that their ancestors already had an advanced high-tech communications network a hundred years earlier than the New Yorkers.'
One week later, 'The Redneck Rebel Gazette' in Iowa reported the following: After digging as deep as 30 feet in a cornfield, Bubba Ray Johnson, a self-taught archaeologist, reported that he found absolutely nothing. Bubba has therefore concluded that 300 years ago, Iowa had already gone wireless.

Did You Know.......

William Henry Harrison delivered the longest Inaugural address, at 8,445 words, on March 4, 1841—a bitterly cold, wet day. He died one month later of pneumonia, believed to have been brought on by prolonged exposure to the elements on his Inauguration Day.
John Adams' Inaugural address, which totaled 2,308 words, contained the longest sentence, at 737 words.
After Washington's second Inaugural address, the next shortest was Franklin D. Roosevelt's fourth address on January 20, 1945, at just 559 words. Roosevelt had chosen to have a simple Inauguration at the White House in light of the nation's involvement in World War II.

Fifteen pacifiers found in dog's stomach

Veterinarians in Warson Woods, Mo., say they found 15 pacifiers, a bottle cap and a piece of a basketball in a 2-year-old bulldog named Lulu.
Lulu's owners, David and Jennifer Swart, said their 18-month-old daughter's pacifiers kept disappearing and they kept buying more.
When Lulu showed an interest in the pacifiers, they took her to the vet, who performed surgery last month after X-rays revealed an unusual gray area in Lulu's stomach, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Sunday.
The vets saved the pacifiers, some of which had turned black from Lulu's stomach acid, to show the Swarts.
Lulu's $808 surgery cost was covered by Veterinary Pet Insurance, a California insurer that declared Lulu's case its most unusual for December after reviewing claims for dogs who ate nails, a packaged fire log, a whole turkey and several wigs.

Cold snap causes iguanas to fall from trees

The chilly weather in southern Naples Florida this week was cold enough to force some iguanas to fall from trees.
Experts say the cold-blooded reptiles go into a deep sleep when the temperature falls into the 40s. Their bodies basically shut off and they lose their grip on the tree.
According to Collier County Domestic Animal Services control supervisor Dana Alger, iguana reports traditionally rise when temperatures drop, as the reptiles seek to warm themselves on asphalt surfaces such as sidewalks, roads and driveways.
Most of the iguanas were once pets that got released when they got too big. The reptiles can grow up to six feet long.

Florida settles suit: $1 to each driver, $2.85 million to lawyers

Facing a $3.5 billion deficit next year, Florida desperately needs all the money it can get. But millions more will disappear because the state has settled a lawsuit that affects millions of motorists.
The Legislature will spend $10.4 million to settle a class action lawsuit over allegations that the state illegally sold drivers’ personal information to marketing firms over a four-year period in violation of a federal law barring the practice. The state made $27 million each year on the deal, according to the lawsuit.
The settlement to drivers?
Drivers who held a license, car registration or state-issued ID from June 1, 2000, through Sept. 30, 2004, will get a one-time credit of $1 when they register or renew a registration between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010.
"Just one dollar?" Sen. Gary Siplin, D-Orlando, asked in a committee hearing on the settlement.
The four South Florida motorists who sued will get $3,000 each, and five law firms that pursued the case for more than six years will divide $2.85-million in legal fees, which is separate from credits paid to consumers.

Dog enjoys a good vacuum

Wish I could train my dog to do that.

Baby squirrel being fed